Learn To Make Hip Hop

...Learn to make hip hop music. become a true beatmaker today.

Vox Soundbox Mini

Written by Site Update on July 28th, 2014

Read more about Vox Soundbox Mini at MusicRadar.com


In recent years, practice amps have undergone something of a revolution; Yamaha was first to shake things up with the living room-friendly Yamaha THR range, and more recently, Blackstar offered its own take with the ID:Core series. Now, Vox has unveiled the Soundbox Mini, a stereo amp with plenty of sonic options.

“It’s equally at home as a music player on the move, thanks to an auxiliary input for your phone or mp3 player”

Where the Soundbox differs from its rivals is in its portability – not only is it compact, but it can be powered with batteries, which makes it equally at home as a music player on the move, thanks to an auxiliary input for your phone or mp3 player.

You get inputs for guitar and mic, as well as a raft of effects, plus guitar, bass and keyboard presets – not to mention Korg’s Acoustage technology, which makes it seem as if the sound is coming from all around the amp, rather than the two four-inch speakers.

Each of the four guitar presets – tweedy clean, AC30 crunch, British high-gain and metal scoop – offers a decent approximation of classic sounds, augmented by the sweet-sounding effects, although the reverbs add more hiss than we’d like.

But while the tones are pretty juicy through headphones, the output from the Soundbox is a little, well, boxy, and not the fullest sound we’ve heard from speakers of this size, either as a guitar amp or portable stereo.

Read more about Vox Soundbox Mini at MusicRadar.com







AudioProFeeds-1

Tell others about us:
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • MySpace
  • Reddit
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks

A Solar-Powered, Outdoor DJ Booth and Interactive Dance Floor for Public Playgrounds

Written by Site Update on July 28th, 2014

Swingsets? Basketball courts? Dutch interactive design firm Yalp imagines populating futuristic public playgrounds with DJ decks and dance floors, for today’s teens.

First, there’s the Fono DJ booth. It’s an outdoor public DJ booth, steel-cased with 14 light-up touch panels. Add a couple of phones, and kids can stream their own music, using the touch panels to control the settings. (In case you’re afraid your neighborhood is about to turn into a teen Ibiza, the makers emphasize that they let the installer choose maximum volume levels and times when the system shuts down.)

Then, in case you want to dance to the music, there’s the Fono dance floor, which responds to movement with cut-up samples.

The team have also devised benches and storage to encourage young people to hang out.

Somehow, I think this is all meant to keep kids off drugs or out of gangs by DJing in the playground. I have no idea how practical it is, but it’s certainly technologically interesting. The steel casing makes the whole rig waterproof and, the creators claim, vandal-proof. It’s a very different vision of touch technology than what you get on an iPhone or iPad. And everything is solar-powered.

Whether this works as a playground concept, I’m not sure, but it does suggest some possibilities for other outdoor technological interactions in other settings.

And the design itself is fascinating – also a winner of the prestigious 2014 Red Dot design award.

More (Dutch and English):
Fono hangout
Outdoor DJ System

And another video:

There’s also a hands-on video and (Dutch-language) interviews, where we learn that DJs really do nothing but wave their hands in the air and the boys won’t let any of the girls play on the decks… which also means the boys are behind the decks while the girls are dancing on their own. Come on, guys. Ahem.

Thanks to DJ Xtopher [SoundCloud] for this one. And yes – I agree, it is the new Ping Pong.

1976.fono_dj-set_13

2004.fono-hangout

The post A Solar-Powered, Outdoor DJ Booth and Interactive Dance Floor for Public Playgrounds appeared first on Create Digital Music.


AudioProFeeds-1

Tell others about us:
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • MySpace
  • Reddit
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks

Yamaha NTX700C

Written by Site Update on July 28th, 2014

Read more about Yamaha NTX700C at MusicRadar.com


It may predate the steel-string acoustic by many a year, but the gut-string classical has dropped off the radar of most pop and rock musicians. Perhaps Yamaha’s NTX700C will help to change the situation…

Nylon strings were developed after the World War II, and outside of the classical world, the nylon-string guitar began to be used by a diverse number of players in jazz, pop, country and, of course, Latin settings – it’s essential to Brazilian styles, and you’ll doubtless have heard it while watching the World Cup or listening to the latest Rodrigo Y Gabriela album.

Along the way, the guitar has changed to cater for players crossing over from steel-string acoustic and electric instruments, creating a modern hybrid that might have nylon strings, but feels and looks more like a steel-string.

“From its balanced acoustic sound to its amplified tone, Yamaha really has got this right”

Yamaha’s NX range was launched back in 2009 in two flavours. The NCX has the wider classical-style neck, flat fingerboard and 12 frets to the body, while the NTX has a narrower neck, a radius’d ‘board and 14 frets to the body. Our Chinese review sample is cheapest, and although the NTX700 has been available from the get-go, this cedar-topped ‘C’ version was launched earlier this year.

It looks like an APX with its modern almost offset outline. There’s no soundhole rosette, just some arty marquetry-style decoration, and yes, like the APX, that soundhole is oval. Construction is crisp and faultless.

The neck is wider than your average steel-string, of course, but it’s very easy to get used to, plus, unlike the classical guitar, we get side dot-position markers and two strap buttons. And although the back and sides are laminate, the top is solid cedar. To generalise, compared with a spruce top, you can expect a slightly softer tonality. Here, beneath its amber-toned finish, it looks damn cool, too.

All NX guitars, from this start- up model to the high-end £3k Japanese-made versions, use the same preamp and pickup system. Two ART soundboard transducers sit under the bridge on the bass and treble sides.

These pass to volume controls on the preamp so you can set the all-important balance between the lows and highs. Then we have a three-band EQ, tuner (which doesn’t mute your output) and master volume.

From its balanced acoustic sound – quite subdued in terms of volume – to its amplified tone, Yamaha really has got this right. There’s a natural sound with no piezo quack, which records well into your DAW; it loves modern effects, too, and hey, you wanna play it with a pick like Rodrigo (who uses a custom-made version of this very guitar), be our guest.

Read more about Yamaha NTX700C at MusicRadar.com







AudioProFeeds-1

Tell others about us:
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • MySpace
  • Reddit
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks

sonicLAB releases CosmosƒFx effect plugin and adds morphing formant filters

Written by Site Update on July 28th, 2014

sonicLAB releases CosmosƒFx, a live input stochastic processor plugin with the identical engine to Cosmosƒ vSaturn. The synth engine of CosmosƒFx offers three handling methods which concerns the ma [Read More]
AudioProFeeds-1

Tell others about us:
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • MySpace
  • Reddit
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks

Voodoo Lab Pedal Power 2 Plus

Written by Site Update on July 27th, 2014

Read more about Voodoo Lab Pedal Power 2 Plus at MusicRadar.com


Voodoo Lab was the first mainstream company to provide high-quality isolated power supplies for pedals, and the Pedal Power 2 has become the go-to device.

The latest version, the Pedal Power 2 Plus, has plenty of juice for a medium-sized pedalboard, and some useful features not found elsewhere – such as a ‘sag’ knob on two of the outlets, for turning down the juice to simulate a low battery – useful for transistor-based fuzz circuits.

There’s also an IEC output socket for adding another unit or a mains-powered pedal.

Read more about Voodoo Lab Pedal Power 2 Plus at MusicRadar.com

AudioProFeeds-1

Tell others about us:
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • MySpace
  • Reddit
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks

Akai Posts Sound Video of $199 Rhythm Wolf Drum Machine – Hungry for a Review?

Written by Site Update on July 27th, 2014

Now we know what Akai’s drum machine plus simple bass synth sounds like. And no surprises – it’s a simple, classic-inspired analog drum machine with a basic synth. And yeah, you’re probably going to want to consider one, certainly at this price. (We’ll just be pitting it against the KORG volca beats, which we know we love.)

Akai has posted an official, if preliminary and unlisted, video to their account, and made the presence known to readers of their forum. So, this is the real thing – just not quite up to the usual marketing video material, though that’s fine by me. Akai reps I’ve talked to have been just as impatient to get a working unit as readers have. (It’s still not clear what happened at Musikmesse even to people in the booth; it seems some of the Akai folks did indeed think that the one demo unit they had was damaged by using an improper power supply. Booths at trade shows get chaotic.)

It seems that what’s happened is that someone at Akai has decided to “leak” an internal video from the company showing what the unit sounds like. It’s a bit rough, but you get a good idea of the basic character of the synth.

That leak appears intentional, as it was announced on the community forum and the YouTube video, while unlisted, has all the links to the Akai community. See the discussion with Akai’s Dan on a thread this week. Anyway, it’s out now, and it is definitely a video shot by Akai. Akai told me at least one previous “leak” of the Rhythm Wolf on SoundCloud was a fake.

That one-oscillator synth and filter sounds okay, but thin enough that it probably isn’t going to replace other synths. That’s expected, given the synth’s architecture. (I’m imagining carrying a KORG volca and, of course, MeeBlip anode with it.) Also, even with headphones, I’m very curious how the bass drum stacks up against the massive bass drum on the volca beats.

But as I noted in the spring, the interface design of this unit is fantastic from a workflow perspective. And it seems they’ve put together a really balanced sound as far as the drum parts. It shares plenty of Roland TR character, but it’s also already sounding distinct. You just can’t quite tell from this video. (That is, it sounds like… a drum machine. We’ll know more when we can hear it properly.)

In other words, this is more or less what we expected and hoped for even looking at the non-sounding unit in Frankfurt earlier this year. And that’s good news.

That said, it’s worth observing that the video is preliminary. Firmware changes can have a big impact on sound, even on an analog synth, by changing the ranges of knobs and whatnot. But I’m pleased: the Rhythm Wolf looks like a contender. Can’t wait to get the real unit. And having these fun, little machines that are more idiosyncratic, like the volca beats, Rhythm Wolf, and so on, to me is really creatively inspiring. It’s not just that these machines are more affordable. It’s that the challenge of making them smaller, simpler, and cheaper can often produce something with a lot of character. And they can be a lot of fun.

Stay tuned.

Previously:
Akai’s $ 199 Analog Drum Machine with Bass Synth: Rhythm Wolf Details

Hands on with Akai’s $ 199 Rhythm Wolf Drum Machine, More Details

rhythmwolfside

The post Akai Posts Sound Video of $ 199 Rhythm Wolf Drum Machine – Hungry for a Review? appeared first on Create Digital Music.


AudioProFeeds-1

Tell others about us:
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • MySpace
  • Reddit
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks

Cioks DC10

Written by Site Update on July 27th, 2014

Read more about Cioks DC10 at MusicRadar.com


Based in Denmark, Cioks has several power supplies in its own range, and also makes the PowerFactor for Eventide. The DC10 is the sort of supply that would be well suited to a medium-sized pedalboard.

It has no fewer than 10 outlets in eight isolated sections – outlets seven and eight share the same ground, as do nine and 10.

We like the Swiss army knife approach of the DC10, in that it seems to be designed to take on any pedal (including 15V Radial Tonebones), and comes with all the cables you need – so it’s ready for action straight out of the box.

Read more about Cioks DC10 at MusicRadar.com

AudioProFeeds-1

Tell others about us:
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • MySpace
  • Reddit
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks

Digitech Supernatural Ambient Reverb

Written by Site Update on July 27th, 2014

Read more about Digitech Supernatural Ambient Reverb at MusicRadar.com


Although it’s been available exclusively from American retailer Pro Guitar Shop since 2012, the Supernatural has only just been unleashed upon the UK.

“Huge soundscapes are this pedal’s speciality”

Its seven presets utilise authentic Lexicon algorithms, and although these settings include spring and plate modes, huge soundscapes are this pedal’s speciality.

The reverbs are controlled via mix, liveliness and decay knobs, which are mounted onto a weighty metal enclosure with stereo ins and outs, plus an internal bypass trails on/off switch.

Sounds

Dive straight into the Supernatural’s pitch-shifted Shimmer mode, and you’ll have no problem nailing the ambient vibe, with a slightly detuned trail that gives each note a haunting halo.

Meanwhile, the Shine and Supernova settings add modulation for extra sheen, and although hardcore reverb fans may miss the tweakability of similar effects from Eventide and Strymon units, they’re very usable, well dialled-in voices.

Likewise, the phased Pherb and chorus’d Plate Mod – in the wrong hands, these have the potential to sound overly processed, but each effect’s intensity can be controlled via interaction between the mix and liveliness controls, which helps to tame – or enhance – the wilder aspects of the ‘verbs.

What’s more, the plate and spring settings are perfectly serviceable, too; they’re not what you’d buy this pedal for, but they expand its flexibility.

Any player who longs for the soundtrack-worthy reverbs of more expensive processors should check the Supernatural out. It’s not going to replace your amp’s spring reverb, but for post-rock and ambient players, it could become a pedalboard lynchpin.

Read more about Digitech Supernatural Ambient Reverb at MusicRadar.com







AudioProFeeds-1

Tell others about us:
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • MySpace
  • Reddit
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks

T-Rex Fuel Tank Junior

Written by Site Update on July 27th, 2014

Read more about T-Rex Fuel Tank Junior at MusicRadar.com


The Junior is the smallest of the four units in the T-Rex Fuel Tank range, but we’ve chosen to spotlight it, as it seems the perfect no-nonsense choice for a small board of up to five pedals.

You get five isolated 9V outputs, each capable of putting out 120mA, so it will easily powera set of five standard pedals.

In addition, you can use two of the outputs to power an 18V pedal via a serial cable (sold separately), or power five pedals from one output (max 24mA each) with a daisy chain cable (sold separately).

Read more about T-Rex Fuel Tank Junior at MusicRadar.com

AudioProFeeds-1

Tell others about us:
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • MySpace
  • Reddit
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks

Five12 Numerology 4 to be released in September

Written by Site Update on July 27th, 2014

Five12 has announced that Numerology 4 will be released in September, 2014. All new purchasers of N3 licences get a free upgrade to N4. New features for both N4 SE and Pro: 64-bit: There are now 64-bi [Read More]
AudioProFeeds-1

Tell others about us:
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • MySpace
  • Reddit
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks