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New Native Instruments Komplete Keyboards, Software Updates Revealed in Various Leaks

Sunday, August 31st, 2014
Guessing that 'new' flag will not be a feature. This image has been making the rounds.

Guessing that ‘new’ flag will not be a feature. This image has been making the rounds.

Keeping new musical instrument announcements under wraps prior to embargo dates is proving, again, to be more or less impossible. Native Instruments’ Komplete updates, teased in a video on Friday, have now been prematurely revealed via one print magazine hitting newsstands (Beat, in Germany), and multiple leaks by dealers (some even crawled by Google, according to a CDM reader). Forum members at GearSlutz have been dutifully reproducing everything, leaving few secrets. From there, the cat’s out of the bag; I’m seeing this spreading through German-language outlets and expect others will pick this up soon. Oddly, forum members and commenters have also proceeded to review the announcement in some detail, apparently on the merits of a serious of text bullet points and screen shots alone.

I think that’s a little ridiculous. You need to hear instruments to judge them; you need to actually use hardware and software to judge its quality. Implementation is everything.

This isn’t the whole story – not yet. The leaks don’t yet reveal any details of how that works, only the basic physical form of the keyboards, as well as what instruments have been added in Komplete 10′s software.

So, I’m posting it here in the hopes that more inquisitive CDM readers will ask us some questions. What would you want to see tested; what would you want to know? Let’s see some questions rather than premature reviews, and we can find some answers. (My experience is, readers here ask terrific questions.)

But for starters, here’s the information shared on GearSlutz and in a story on (German-language site) Amazona.de. The big story, as the teaser video suggested, is keyboards designed for controlling instruments in Komplete. Many of the hardware features you’ve already seen in the “teaser” video (which actually showed quite a lot):

Komplete Kontrol keyboards:
25-, 49-, and 61-key models
8 encoders with displays
Touch strips
Browser
Scale and Arpeggiator controls
USB, MIDI in/out, pedal inputs
Pricing starting at 499€ (as reported in Beats’ print article, now on newsstands here in Germany)

Komplete 10 update – 12,000 sounds, 130GB of content:
Three new pianos: The Grandeur, The Maverick, The Gentleman
Three new synth/instruments: Kontour, Rounds, and Polyplex
Drumlab, Session Horn, and Supercharger Driver now included
Komplete Kontrol keyboard ready

polyplex

rounds-580x327

Do stay tuned for official information from Native Instruments and CDM’s own take. (For instance, I would hope you’re wondering a little bit about what’s behind these leaked screenshots.)

That said, I think it’s hilarious that one forum poster has already prepared a parody image. The team at NI is pretty thick-skinned; I think they’ll have a chuckle at this and assume the serious reviews will occur once people actually try what they’ve built.

And – yes, forums are amazing, weird places. I don’t have enough time to do things like this image, and this is actually my day job. Kudos. I think.

Someone should create a Reaktor ensemble for The Disappointment that actually makes sound. I’d use it in a set. Where’s Tim Exile?

Lolz all around. Someone named "jokerone" on GearSlutz has a lot of time on his/her hands.

Lolz all around. Someone named “jokerone” on GearSlutz has a lot of time on his/her hands. Actually, I’d very much like an impulse response of a dumpster. Let’s get on that.

See you soon with all the solid details. Have a good weekend, and make sure your Photoshopping leaves some time for making music.

The post New Native Instruments Komplete Keyboards, Software Updates Revealed in Various Leaks appeared first on Create Digital Music.


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Native Instruments Teases New Komplete Hardware

Friday, August 29th, 2014

glitch

Native Instruments today releases a teaser video which it says is “A glimpse of the future” of Komplete, the production suite that includes Reaktor, Kontakt, and various synths and the like.

That video clearly shows some kind of hardware. Now, the degree to which I can speculate about an unreleased product is inversely proportional to the amount I know about such a product.

So, with that in mind, let me objectively describe what you see in the video in ways that are truly obviously discernible, for those of you who can’t be bothered to squint at the video yourself. I’d say we see:

Lights.
Colored lights. (Red! Blue! White! Assuming I’m not color blind… or that the Polizei haven’t shown up. Sorry about running that red light on my bike Monday.)
White things in a row. (from several angles, those things in a row … teeth?)
A knob/encoder.
Scale / Arp buttons.
A browser interface (Browse, Instance, Back, directional keys, Preset increment-decrement buttons, and Enter, plus an encoder).
Knobs/encoders with displays with amounts (Reverb, Reso, Drive, Glitch).
Two tall things with a big, tall LED strip in between and two things on top.
Loud noises.
Native Instruments: The Future of Sound (logo).

So – it’s obviously a Eurorack module. Or an analog monosynth. Joke.

Rest assured, we will bring you more solid information when we can, seeing as I practically trip over Native Instruments headquarters when I try to get out of bed in the morning. (Tricky, that. But I work for you. I’m keeping them as close as I can with that in mind.)

The post Native Instruments Teases New Komplete Hardware appeared first on Create Digital Music.


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Native Instruments updates all Komplete Instruments and Effects – incl. 64-bit AAX

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013

Native Instruments has released updates for its current Komplete product range, bringing 64-Bit AAX support for ProTools 11 and advanced integration in Maschine 2.0 host software. Absynth 5.2.0: Advan [Read More]
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What NI Was Teasing: Monark Minimoog-Modeling Synth, Remade Battery, in New Komplete

Wednesday, March 13th, 2013
What you can see: something that looks a lot like a Minimoog. What you can't: this decades-old synth was actually recreated using fairly new, cutting-edge digital filter research. Images courtesy NI.

What you can see: something that looks a lot like a Minimoog. What you can’t: this decades-old synth was actually recreated using fairly new, cutting-edge digital filter research. Images courtesy NI.

Native Instruments has been teasing new instrument software in recent days, and now we get to see what they were previewing: a new virtual-analog monosynth and a remade version of their drum sampler.

But, hold on, before everyone yawns and leaves the building – there’s reason to pay attention to this news.

First, yes, there is something notably absent in today’s announcement. While NI is making Komplete, their bundle of their extensive stable of software instruments, available for preorder, there’s still no sign of a big upgrade to Reaktor. The fact that the Monark video showed Reaktor patching may have confused matters further. In fairness, Reaktor did get a couple of important upgrades recently; both simply had the misfortune to be labeled as point releases rather than “Reaktor 6.” (Reaktor 5.7 is nonetheless a major new version with a substantially new UI, and Reaktor 5.8 brought an industry-leading, user-friendly OSC implementation.) But fans of the modular software no doubt want more.

What you do get, though, is still big news. Monark may seem like just another modeled virtual analog synth, but under the hood, it represents significant advances in modeling technology, a labor of love from some of NI’s DSP mad scientists. And Battery 4 shows that NI is committed to an instrument in a category all its own.

Oh, yeah, and Komplete is still a ridiculous amount of software, though that’s not exactly news. Let me explain.

Battery 4: still the most advanced drag-and-drop drum sampler out there, now upgraded. In fact, still one of the only dedicated drum samplers out there, since others tend to be general-purpose samplers or drum machine-oriented.

Battery 4: still the most advanced drag-and-drop drum sampler out there, now upgraded. In fact, still one of the only dedicated drum samplers out there, since others tend to be general-purpose samplers or drum machine-oriented.

We’ll be looking more in detail at Monark with the engineers at NI who built it. What NI can’t say, legally, I can: this is clearly a model of the classic Minimoog. (NI has to legall call it “a classic analog monophonic synthesizer that has shaped four decades of popular music.”)

CDM got an exclusive hands-on with the instrument, and it sounds extraordinary in a way software virtual analog instruments usually don’t. For people just looking for vintage sounds, it’ll fit the bill, because the Minimoog is such a part of music. But I think it could also appeal to synth lovers. Now, the Minimoog is perhaps the most-modeled, most influential synth ever, in some way influencing the design of countless hardware and software designs that followed, so the idea that a new model is “revolutionary” may seem downright odd. From an engineering standpoint, though, NI is applying the latest research in digital filter models. In fact, you can read research on the technique, if you like such things:

The Art of VA Filter Design, by Vadim Zavalishin

There are years of modeling work that went into Monark, which explains some of NI’s press materials on this. They’ve modeled not only the individual components, but the way those components behave together, including filter overload, filter/oscillator drift, and envelope behavior.

What NI has that its rivals don’t is the person who authored that book. (Ahem. In fact, for anyone complaining about Reaktor upgrades, my question for you is, have you mastered Core yet? DSP science? No? Then you should make your own five-year plan wrapping your head around Vadim’s extensive DSP tutorials.)

Many models of the Moog, while aesthetically copying the front panel, are fairly generic in terms of how they actually model the sound. That’s perfectly fine for musical purposes, but it means you don’t get the sorts of dynamic behaviors and sounds you did on the original. So, when Arturia announced they were porting their Minimoog models to the iPad, while that’s nice enough, you could choose instead something that sounds more like a Moog on your computer (Monark), or Moog’s own more creative take on what an iPad could be (Animoog). As far as modeling, Monark simply goes a lot further. (The best competition, as readers observe, is Urs Heckmann’s DIVA. An A/B of those two could e fascinating. But DIVA, unlike Monark, eschews the classic Minimoog front panel for a more complex, knob-laden design, which destroys some of the elegance of the original from a usability perspective. The flipside: DIVA also does more than the Minimoog original, so could appeal to those who want something that extends the original concept.)

None of this will mean much if you’re just tired of monosynths. But even looking to more futuristic instruments, Monark should give you hope. The same filter tech that works here to replicate a classic, decades-old synth could also be applied to more ground-breaking digital instruments to come, too.

(I have more to say about filters, virtual analog, digital, and real analog in regards to the MeeBlip, our own hardware synth project, but that should come … another day.)

Battery 4, for its part, is good news for people who rely on drum samplers. This category is beginning to look threatened, replaced by more general-purpose samplers on one hand, or drum machines on the other. Battery 4, then, fits a significant niche for people who want sophisticated, complex drum samples. You get a workflow designed as such, with drag-and-drop editing to create drum patches and route effects. To that, Battery 4 adds more NI effects, including NI’s recent “Solid Mix” EQ and compressor, a transient follower/effect, tape saturation, low fidelity processor, and convolution reverb. The UI has also been overhauled and looks far clearer and more modern, with a new color coding system to make it easier to follow what you’re doing.

komplete9

Komplete 9, as the latest version of Komplete, remains utterly massive, with 370 GB of soundware for some 65 instruments and effects. You now get the Mix Series for use in your favorite DAW, a string ensemble, the “world’s largest upright piano,” and other additions. In fact, while Native Instruments gets a regular flogging in comments on this site (cough), there’s still not anyone else who offers everything from Reaktor-based interactive instruments to traditional soundware of horns and bass, the full-featured Reaktor development environment and Kontakt sampler and Massive synth in one box. The real challenge for Komplete as a product remains that almost no one would need or even find a way to use all those things. But if you can find some way to use just a fraction of it, the value remains, especially as Komplete is sticking with its reduced price: $ 559 / 449 € for the basic edition. (Ultimate runs you closer to a grand.)

Upgrades start at $ 149 / 149 €, and the software arrives toward the end of the month.

Stay tuned for more details inside the process of designing Monark; I think you’ll like what the engineers have to say.

Komplete @ Native Instruments


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Native Instruments Announces Komplete 9 and Komplete 9 Ultimate (incl. Monark Monosynth and Battery 4 Drum Sampler)

Monday, March 11th, 2013

Native Instruments today announced the latest generation of its two Komplete software bundles. Komplete 9 includes 33 instruments and effects with six new additions, including the brand-new Monark [Read More]
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Muse Research releases Receptor VIP in 3 Configurations (incl. SSDs and Komplete 8)

Monday, August 20th, 2012

Read the full story @ KVR Audio
Muse Research and Development has announced there are now three configurations of their new RECEPTOR VIP dedicated hardware plug-in player. This software-powered music instrument combines the ease o [Read More]
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Native Instruments announces time-limited special upgrade offer on Komplete 8 (299 USD/EUR)

Thursday, March 22nd, 2012

Read the full story @ KVR Audio
Native Instruments has announced a time-limited special offer to mark the official beginning of spring. From March 21st – 29th 2012, owners of Massive, Absynth, Battery, FM8, Reaktor, Kontakt, Guitar [Read More]
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Muse Research and Development announces Komplete 8 / Komplete 8 Ultimate now Pre-installed on Receptor 2+

Tuesday, December 20th, 2011

Read the full story @ KVR Audio
Muse Research and Development has enhanced their Receptor 2+ line of hardware plug-in players with Native Instruments Komplete 8 pre-installed and ready for authorization on all models, and Komplete 8 [Read More]
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NI Komplete 8 Ultimate

Thursday, October 6th, 2011

Once upon a time, Native Instruments, like many other companies, made a range of synthesizer products which, at first, emulated classic instruments.

They then expanded to start building a wider range of applications of their own, including Kontakt which has become the stand-out third-party sampler available.

As other sample library suppliers began to use this as their playback engine of choice, NI developed their own libraries, collaborating with studios, other manufacturers and celebrities in the development of new content, as well as a free, sample-player version of Kontakt, which encouraged third party developers yet more.

“Once the install process is finished, it’s kid-in-a-sweet-shop time.”

Fast forward to the here and now and NI have a staggering array of instruments, sample collections and effects processors at their disposal, which are available separately, or in appropriately grouped bundles.

However, if you’re ravenous to get your hands on a number of these, your appetite is about to be sated in the most astonishing way. Enter Komplete 8 Ultimate – a bundle of no fewer than 50 titles, including a huge number of Kontakt libraries, additional patches for almost all of NI’s synths and much more besides. Gulp.

Let’s run through the install process first, as it’s a little unusual. Komplete Ultimate arrives on a neat silver USB hard-drive – but don’t be fooled, as this is merely a replacement for the 50-odd DVDs you’d require to install the content otherwise.

Put another way, this drive won’t read or play back the samples that make up Ultimate – it’s merely a way to provide all of the install files, and once you’re done you put it back in the box.

So be prepared to sacrifice 200GB of your current hard drive space if you’re intending to install all content. It feels weird but it makes sense the more you think about it.

Up and running

At the install stage, this is broken down into applications (Massive, Absynth 5, Guitar Rig 5 etc) and content, which contains the sample libraries for instruments such as Kontakt 5 and Battery 3, for instance.

While you must install the applications to your main hard drive, the Content, which accounts for about 170GB of the total data, can be installed anywhere, so a fast internal or external drive is recommended (again, that’s ‘anywhere’ apart from the Ultimate drive that comes in the box…).

Neatly, if you’re installing ‘over’ a previous Komplete incarnation, the installer has a look at your hard disk and works out if you need a fresh install or merely an update to applications you own already. Special mention to the gate-fold box that opens to reveal the vast array of goodies which await you.

Be patient though, as a full install of applications and content libraries takes three hours, even though the progress bar frustratingly spends most of this time telling you that it only has 41 minutes left to run.

There’s no doubt the drive-based install will divide opinion – have NI missed a trick by not making it house Komplete’s content? While the applications would have to be installed to your hard drive, it might make more sense for this drive to house the libraries and have all of the content premapped in the software.

That said, this would mean you could only run Komplete on one computer at a time – not great for studios that want to offer it to multiple clients simultaneously.

Getting familiar

Fortunately, once this process is finished, NI’s Service Center, which is used for authorisation, only needs a single 25-number code to register the entire collection, saving you the need to complete this process 50 times for each part of the bundle. This is printed on the back of the manual and, thereafter, it’s kid-in-a-sweet-shop time.

For those unfamiliar with how NI structure their instruments, you might be momentarily baffled to discover that your plug-in folder has only gained a handful of new instruments but panic not, as a number of these are ‘hosts within your host’.

Kontakt 5, for instance, will act as the playback device for all of the library content included in the box, while Guitar Rig is increasingly inappropriately named, as this is where you can build effects chains of all descriptions, including tone and dynamics modules.

Likewise, through the inclusion of a number of ‘players’ within Reaktor itself, it’s well worth having a thorough look around within these plug-ins, especially as you begin your trawl through what’s included.

As Komplete as it gets

Reviews often finish by asking, ‘to whom will this product appeal’? The more apt question here might be to whom won’t Komplete Ultimate appeal, as it’s hard to imagine a user-base not catered for by the extraordinary array of products bundled within this collection.

Dance enthusiasts will love Massive and Absynth’s new sounds while pop producers will be overjoyed by the pianos, drums, basses and guitars offered within Kontakt 5.

For sound designers, Reaktor’s appeal is expanded, while everyone will delight in Guitar Rig – while it continues to provide great guitar-based effects, the inclusion of Traktor’s 12 effects and the new EQ and dynamic processors means that its appeal stretches way beyond guitar processing alone.

Meanwhile, those interested in score writing now have quality tools at their disposal with the inclusion of Session Strings Pro and two Evolve Mutations libraries that bring widescreen sounds to your DAW.

Having named this library ‘Ultimate’, NI face a challenge when releasing succession products further down the line, but that’s a nice headache for their marketing department.

In the meantime, this collection really does represent the sonic equivalent of the adventure playground – if you can’t find what you’re looking for here, you’re in the wrong business. Simply mind-blowing.

Read more about NI Komplete 8 Ultimate at MusicRadar.com




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Native Instruments releases Komplete 8 and Komplete 8 Ultimate

Friday, September 2nd, 2011

Read the full story @ KVR Audio
Native Instruments has released Komplete 8 and Komplete 8 Ultimate, two new software bundles that offer comprehensive assortments of professional instruments and effects for studio production and live [Read More]
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