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2CAudio releases Kaleidoscope – Visual Sound Designer

Sunday, January 25th, 2015

2CAudio has released Kaleidoscope, a new Visual Sound Designer for Mac OS X and Windows in AU, VST and AAX plug-in formats. Here’s what they say: “Five years ago we revolutionized the [Read More]
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Roland Announces Super UA Audio Interface – Audiophile Sound for Personal Music Production

Friday, January 23rd, 2015

Roland has announced the Super UA, a high-performance USB 2.0 audio interface featuring proprietary S1LKi technology. Offering exceptional sound with 1-bit DSD and 32-bit PCM playback, VS Preamps, [Read More]
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Sony Updates Sound Forge Pro Mac to v2.5 and releases SpectraLayers 3

Friday, January 23rd, 2015

Sony Creative Software has released a free 2.5 update to Sound Forge Pro Mac, and a Version 3 upgrade to SpectraLayers Pro [Win/Mac]. The free 2.5 update for Sound Forge Pro Mac features disc-at-once [Read More]
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Sound Magic release Serenade Headquarter – Virtual Preamp and Headphone Effect Units

Tuesday, January 13th, 2015

Sound Magic has released Serenade Headquarter, a multi effect unit for Mac OS X and Windows related to their hardware (currently the Serenade Pro Audio Interface). Based on the hardware, it [Read More]
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Free Download Puts Your Sound in a Cold War NSA Listening Station

Monday, January 12th, 2015

teufelsberg-impulse-responses-01

Long before PRISM was tuning in your chats and emails, the US National Security Agency (NSA) had Teufelsberg – the three-domed structure erected on top of a “devil’s mountain” of WWII rubble dumped on top of a half-finished Nazi military school. From this perch high above Berlin, the US government and its allies listened in on the Communists of the Eastern Bloc and Soviet Union.

Touring Teufelsberg these days is certainly possible, but it requires some climbing – you’re unlikely to be able to haul a sound system to add reverberation from its magnificent, neo-futuristic geodesic dome spaces. Here’s the next best thing.

The folks at Balance Mastering got into the different domes of the structure to record impulse responses – files that you can add to a range of reverb tools (including some free ones) to make it sound as if your sources are being heard in this environment. (The technique is known as convolution.)

They’ve captured some amazing sounds. You get cavernous reverbs, but with a lot of character – strange reflections and resonances owing to the space – in a number of variations. Logic and Ableton each have reverb plug-ins you can use these files with, and Balance Mastering in the article suggest other solutions, too, including free Mac and Windows plug-ins.

Free Teufelsberg NSA listening tower impulse responses

If you’re curious about the space – which has also been the scene to some Berlin party history (well, and the odd Native Instruments promo video), VICE/Motherboard have been there:

Take a Tour of Teufelsberg, Berlin’s Abandoned NSA Listening Station

Maybe that isn’t your only wish. Curious what your tracks sound like on a big club sound system – and don’t have any friends running sound at Berghain? Solved:
Free Funktion One impulse responses. Hear your mix at London club The Hive Project.

The post Free Download Puts Your Sound in a Cold War NSA Listening Station appeared first on Create Digital Music.


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Free AudioKit Lets iOS, Mac Developers Code Synths and Sound

Monday, January 12th, 2015

AudioKit

AudioKit is a promising-looking new open source tool set for coding synthesizers, music, and sound on Apple platforms (though it could certainly be ported to other places if you have the time).

The draw: you get not only a robust library but loads of examples and tests, too, for a variety of applications, in both Objective-C and Apple’s new Swift language. And it’s free. The contributors will look familiar – and the core engine comes from community contributions around that most enduring of synthesis tools, Csound. (For those worried about obsolescence and the pace of technology, Csound has its roots in tools developed one half century ago, so in computer terms more or less the dawn of time.) In fact, what AudioKit is in effect is Csound as an audio engine, with Objective-C and Swift as the API – no orchestra/score files required. (And if you don’t know what I just said about “scores” and “orchestras” but do know Objective-C and Swift, well, this is definitely for you.)

There are examples for control and playback, convolution, FM and granular synthesis, and sequencing, among others. Below, they’ve produced a video that shows how a game can be enhanced with generated sound using the library. Features:

  • 100+ synths and effects, including physical models, spectral effects, granular synthesis, reverbs, etc.
  • Built-in sampling, complete with recording and storage functionality.
  • Sequencing you can trigger from code.
  • Examples with granular synthesis, convolution, effects processing, pitch-shifting, and more.
  • Human-readable code. (Yay, humans!) They write: “Conductors control Orchestras, which contain Instruments that produce Notes. Clear methods with Apple-style naming conventions, Xcode completion, documentation and tool-tips.”
  • Sound code you can integrate with your app logic.

AudioKit for Game Audio: Space Cannon from AudioKit on Vimeo.

Now, in some ways this is a mirror image of what we did with libpd. The notion of libpd was to separate sound and synthesis from the code that runs the app. The very same interactions are possible; the workflow emphasis is just different. (The basic principle of embedding a free tool as a library is otherwise the same, and this now means developers can use both Pure Data and Csound on the latest mobile platforms.)

Of course, a lot of us will choose both. For those comfortable with patching, or developers working with composers and sound designers who prefer to patch rather than code, using the two libraries together may make the most sense. For those comfortable with coding who want to sketch app logic and sound in the same environment, working with code directly here will be more appealing. (See also tools like Python’s lovely pyo.)

Add this to libpd, plus the weekend’s announcement of a new sync library, and it’s clear that free software and open source tools can coexist with Apple’s proprietary platform. At the risk of offending more rigid free software zealots, I think that’s only a good thing. It promotes coding literacy and self-sufficiency, and it demonstrates the flexibility, durability, and power of free software licenses to help people work together to solve problems. That can only encourage people to toy with free platforms, whether it’s connecting an Arduino or Raspberry Pi or dual-booting that Apple laptop to Linux. And having more shared code can also benefit platforms outside the walled garden.

Oh, plus it’s kind of fun making apps that make noises. Actually, I think that’s probably the most important bit. Check it out:

http://audiokit.io/features/

http://audiokit.io/blog/

Max Mathews, we miss you; it seems you will also live forever.

The post Free AudioKit Lets iOS, Mac Developers Code Synths and Sound appeared first on Create Digital Music.


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Sound Training Online Launches Pro Tools Course With 20% Discount Offer

Wednesday, January 7th, 2015

Sound Training Online, the online division of The Sound Training College, based in Temple Bar, Dublin, which has been teaching music industry professionals for over 25 years, have launched their [Read More]
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Impact Soundworks Releases “ReForged: Cinematic Metallic Sound Design” for Kontakt & WAV

Tuesday, January 6th, 2015

Impact Soundworks has released ReForged: Cinematic Metallic Sound Design, a hybrid cinematic library featuring experimental acoustic instruments and sound design material. The 1,900+ samples [Read More]
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Sample libraries with a Xmas feel: Realsamples Celesta & Sound Dust ghostly keys

Saturday, December 27th, 2014

Celesta
It may be the Christmas holiday vibe, but in these past few weeks I happened to test a trio of sample libraries that shares a certain ‘nostalgic meets cinematic’ quality, somehow perfect for these weeks.

The first one is the Realsamples German Celesta, part of their well known Beurmann collection (here you can find our interview with Nicolay Ketterer from Realsamples). This celesta is from Schiedmayer in Stuttgart, Germany, and was built around 1960. If you can’t afford an expensive beauty like this, the Realsamples library is an ideal option. They recorded every note with 16 different samples, including the release sounds, providing 8 variations of each key release sound, for a total of 1200 single samples.

I really appreciate the fact that Realsamples libraries are available for multiple formats, including EXS24 (very handy for Logic users), Halion, GigaStudio3 and, of course, Kontakt. I had some problems installing the presets while testing the library on Kontakt, but pointing the sampler to the actual samples directory did the trick.

The pristine signal chain (Wagner U47w tube microphones, Crane Song Flamingo preamps, and Universal Audio 2192 digital converters) ensures the instrument the quality it deserves. This Realsamples German Celesta captures the sweet, tinkling and yet mellow sound that fascinated composers like Tschaikowsky, Bartok, Feldman, and made songs like “Sunday Morning” or “In the Wee Small Hours” (among thousands) unforgettable.
For classical music, soundtrack composers, and singer-songwriters, the Realsamples German Celesta is a faithful (albeit pricey) companion that won’t disappoint. Add your quality reverb of choice and you’re in “celestial sonic heaven.”

Price
$ 139.95

dulcitone

Sound Dust is the brainchild of Pendle Poucher, a UK based composer, sound designer and lover of funny noises. I came across Pendle’s work several years ago when he released his first library, a lovely Dulcitone that ended up becoming one of my favorite EXS24 patches.
Sound Dust now boasts a delightful range of products that all share Pendle’s quite unique taste for sound-design.
The two libraries I’ve tested, Ghost Dulcitone 1900 and Plastic Ghost Piano, are perfect examples of Sound Dust’s approach. Traditional instruments, creative digital treatments, a touch of synth magic, convolution reverb impulses (from real spaces and classic hardware) and voilà, the inspiration is served.
The Ghost Dulcitone’s main source is the previously released Dulcitone 1900, a beautiful sounding instrument (the second Dulcitone in Sound Dust catalog), blended with Moog Voyager’s noise bursts, a Nord modular electric piano-style patch, and three altered versions of the original samples (the actual ghosts).
For the Plastic Ghost Piano the main source is a patch created by Pendle years ago on a Technics WSA 1 analog modeling synth, loaded into a convolution reverb plug in and blasted with varying levels of controlled white noise and the output recorded and remapped as a 6 velocity layer multisample. To add character and body, these samples are blended with a Planet T and a bunch of broken piano samples.

You can read further details on the making of these unusual libraries on the Sound Dust website, but the most important question is: how do they sound?
In a word, inspiring. I love their creative and, most of all, musical approach. You can tell this is the result of a musician at work, not just some well executed but sterile tech wizardry.
A large number of well-crafted presets ensure hours of fiddling fun and a ready-to-use range of choices at your disposal. Would you rather create your custom ghostly instruments? No problem, here you get to play with several parameters that will almost make you feel like Doctor Frankenstein.

Between the two libraries I’ve enjoyed the Dulcitone one the most, The piano felt a bit thin for my taste, but I’m sure I could still find plenty of use for it.
If you are looking for warm, organic, cinematic, and somehow unpredictable sounds, you are in the right place with these Sound Dust libraries. Last but not least, they also happen to be VERY reasonably priced. Unless you’re afraid of ghosts, if I were you I would get these libraries ASAP!
Note: both libraries require the full version of Kontakt.

Price
25£

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Nova Sound releases “Percussion Central America” AU & VST instrument plugin for Mac & Win

Thursday, December 25th, 2014

Nova Sound has released Percussion Central America, the first plug-in in the Nova Drum Unit series. Percussion Central America features 64 authentic Caribbean and Central American percussion [Read More]
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