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Mikme, GoPro of microphones, is also serious about sound

Friday, July 24th, 2015

Mikme-Microphone-Push-Button

Being simple and mobile has its advantages. I bet at least once, you’ve recorded some audio sample on your phone. But simplicity often comes at the expense of audio quality – the phone being a perfect example.

An upstart hardware project wants to change that, with a crowd funding campaign that’s winding up its final days now. The Mikme is a small rectangular box, with a single button for recording. It’s wireless, with the ability to connect to mobile apps for tweaking and sharing.

Now, your first impression, then, might be that this is a consumer product – convenient, but delivering sub-par audio. It’s still a bit too soon to judge as the hardware is in prototype phase, but Mikme want to build something that stands up to the demands of pros and musicians. They’ve drawn on talent from professional audio engineering, with a 1″ true condenser capsule – one they say bests the little capsules in current mobile recording solutions from the likes of Zoom. Those rely on smaller electret condensers. (Side note: I won’t knock the electret condensers; I’ve gotten a lot of good results from them. But the bottom line is, you have something here that’s more mobile but doesn’t sacrifice the quality of your recordings to get there – quite the opposite.)

I got to meet founder Philipp Sonnleitner from Vienna when he presented the project at Tech Open Air in Berlin, and even tried the prototype hands-on. Here are more details.

The physical unit. Mikme itself is a small box – part of the reason they’re able to use such a big capsule is that the capsule is practically the size of the whole unit. Rather than a lot of controls, you get one button to start recording on the top – nice in those moments when you want to get recording quickly.

What you don’t need is any wires. There’s an internal battery with a promised 7 hours of recording time. You don’t get removable memory – no SD slots here – but 16 GB of memory is built in. (That was upgraded from the original 8 GB after crowd funders helped the hardware reach its “stretch” goal; now there’s both a 16 GB model or 8 GB if you don’t need all the space and want to save some cash.)

There’s a gold-plated, 1-inch (25 mm) condenser capsule with a cardioid pattern, which compares to 1/2″ (13 mm) electret capsules in USB mics and mobile recorders from Zoom, Tascam, Sony, Blue, Apogee, and so on. You can record at 24-bit and 44.1, 48, or 96 kHz. It’s in a shock mount, and remarkably, I didn’t notice any handling noise.

The unit really is simplicity itself. Tap once to capture, twice to play back the last capture. Tap and hold for a “sound check” feature. The same button lights red if input is clipping.

Along the front, there are simple green LEDs with power/battery and Bluetooth indication, USB for charging or using the unit as a USB mic, headphone out minijack, and volume up/down controls.

Unfortunately, they didn’t add a minijack input, which is too bad. The one thing that would allow me to replace my Zoom H4n with this would be if it could do 4-channel line + mic mixes – and it’d be great to record through the apparently high-quality converters. (Mikme 2 feature request?)

On the bottom, you’ll find a mounting hole, and they’ve thoughtfully included 3/8″ and 1/4″ threads for mic stands and DSLR tripods, respectively. So you can easily stick this on a stand or attach it to a camera. The whole package weighs just 200 grams (less than half a pound), and it’s 70x70x35 mm – you can stick it in your pocket.

Recording modes. The mic can operate in one of three modes:

1. Standalone. Record on the unit, then offload later over Bluetooth or USB.

2. USB mic. Connect it to your device/computer and record over USB.

3. Bluetooth mic. Don’t have a wire/adapter handy? Use Bluetooth instead. Now, this may make you cringe, but that’s because you’re used to mics that transmit an inferior 8 kHz signal; the Mikme uses a full-bandwidth 48 kHz. Philipp showed off the audio quality, and it’s actually hard to tell the Bluetooth stream from the wired stream.

The unit records either in MP4 (if you need more recording time) or lossless raw WAV (that’s still 32 hours at 16 GB). Also, you can record both MP4 and WAV simultaneously, so you have a compact file ready to go without conversion.

mikemediagram

Engineering pedigree. Founder Philipp comes from 8 years at AKG, but so, too, does the team’s mechanical construction engineer. Josef Schneider has a 25-year history including work on the C214, C414, C12VR, K271, K812, and K701. Richard Pribyl, who did acoustic tuning and engineering for Mikme, worked over 40 years in acoustic research and development at AKG and holds over 70 patents.

Of course, that’s just resumes. The explanation Philipp gave me for why you should consider the Mikme is a combination of the capsule and all-in-one design. The capsule he says is what you would normally find in 350€+ XLR mics. Analog and digital input stage and storage are all in a single housing, so that gain staging (which is also transmitted to the app) is performed in a single place.

Now, I didn’t get to properly evaluate the gain controls, again, because I had a prototype. Hardware gain was working, but not software gain controls. The finished model promises 0-30 dB gain settings in increments of 1 dB. Using the Soundcheck feature on the hardware, you can also measure 7 seconds of input and let the hardware adjust gain automatically.

This is interesting, too, for anyone who has cursed the horrible automatic compression on some mobile recorders. The gain is fixed. You can optionally switch on 3 dB-stepped decreases at an overload, but even that will leave the rest of your recording untouched – good news for anyone who has ruined recordings in the past. (Cough. Uh, I mean, no, I never did that.)

Use cases / hands on. On the software side, an app gives you additional controls – useful since there’s no display and limited feedback on the unit. (It’s ready for iOS now, with Android coming by the end of the year.) So you get recording, gain controls, and more.

Part of the vision of the app is also rapid sharing. There’s a clever UI that organizes by pictures – though I sort of hate the use of parallax visual effects. And you also get “Instagram”-style “filter” settings for reverb and the like, which I’m surprised haven’t shown up on apps before.

I have to say, I think this is a mic I’d use a lot more than other mics. There are plenty of times where I just haven’t bothered with cables and the like. The Zoom is relatively terrific, but this is more compact and might in fact sound better. Plus, Bluetooth pairing makes it more of a natural for use with the iPhone (and video), and it’s easier to fit atop a camera.

Case in point: while at Tech Open Air, I dragged one of the people doing demos into a room of the conference and recorded a quick vocal sample that I wound up spinning into a finished track, dumping the recording into Ableton Live and making a fast drum rack. (That track isn’t out yet, but as you can hear from the samples here, the mic’s output is terrific.)

Now, get ready for the investor pitch – Philipp stressed that “mikme is not a microphone manufacturer.” Instead, he says, “we want to enable creatives to capture, produce and publish content such as music, video, podcasts, and interviews within minutes instead hours and in better quality and with less effort.”

I suppose a company like AKG could see their mission in a similar way – it’s really down to how you view an object like a mic. But it’s an interesting mission. Still, I’m most impressed with the mic itself, especially since you can count on various solutions for sharing.

Crowd funding campaign Mikme has raised already a quarter million dollars as I write this, or ten times its funding goal. That means you can preorder a unit starting at US$ 189 (while supplies last).

First deliveries are set for October, with the public launch in January 2016.

The app is available now.

More:

Mikme – Wireless Recording Microphone

http://www.mikme.com/

I’m definitely impressed, and it’s encouraging that crowd funding is making this a reality. I’ll keep in touch with the makers and let you know how the progress progresses.

The post Mikme, GoPro of microphones, is also serious about sound appeared first on Create Digital Music.


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Sail a Sea of Sound, in Beautiful World of Max Cooper and Tom Hodge

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2015

Producer Max Cooper, alongside his collaborator Tom Hodge, this week shares an intimate reflection on what motivates him in sound and science.

In the video for Sonos Studio, the Belfast-born musician describes loving when sound “wraps you up in this warm … sea.” But there’s a system that reveals itself, even as the scientific method can unfold the mysteries around us. So if this music sounds personal and secret, perhaps it has a direct analog to Cooper’s past life as a scientist, the “introspective side of science,” as he puts it. That is, ” whether it’s a piece of music or a scientific idea or a natural system, you’re trying to understand this abstract system in your head… to make models of how the parts interact.” I suppose to me it’s not so much a literal connection to biological computation as the fact that Mr. Cooper can be inspired to find those surprising interactions of parts in both worlds.

maxcooper

But what happens in the mind as you make such explorations? Animator Nick Cobby imagines those unseen moving parts in three-dimensional motion. “Painted” in After Effects and Cinema 4D, flights of colorful fancy speculate on mathematical theory and the way in which the brain might process exterior sound:

Max Cooper and Tom Hodge – Remnants – Official Video by Nick Cobby from Max Cooper on Vimeo.

This video is about the self-contained nature of mind and matter.

The physical processing of sounds by the brain leave remnants in its structure as it learns about the outside world. Eventually the universe and the platonic realm of laws and structures are perceived. But while the natural laws and their resulting universe seem to create and contain the mind, the mind ultimately contains them all.

Out now on Fields:
http://hyperurl.co/MCartefactEP
http://btprt.dj/1DHZhHk

More on the video:
Nick Cobby explores the human mind in music video for Max Cooper and Tom Hodge [de zeen]

You might find yourself drifting off on a personal sea in music Cooper/Hodge have shared lately, like the eerie “Teotihuacan (Part 2)”:

This track started with a visit to the pyramids of Teotihuacan in Mexico. A beautiful place, but a place where a lot of the original culture and knowledge that created the pyramids has been lost, and replaced with a rebuilt, tourist trap.

So it’s a mix of loss and sadness and beauty with an edge of modern misuse, which I tried to capture in the original strings from which the track was built. I also made some binaural recordings of the sounds there, and a storm which came in, to give a real layer of atmosphere from the actual location. Tom Hodge then played piano to these elements, bringing the whole piece to life.

I loved the piano on it’s own in addition to the strings version, so as well as the Part 2 on the EP, we also created a Part 1 piano solo version with the piano sent into a feedback matrix with lots of randomising to create unusual textures. This part 1 version can be downloaded for free from www.maxcooper.net as part of the Quotient Series.

It’s well worth signing up and downloading that series:
http://maxcooper.net

– to hear things like this:

– as well as treating yourself to a copy of the beautiful Artefact (Remixes) EP the pair put out in May.

For more music, find Satirist’s remix of “Remnants” on XLR8R as a free download:

Max Cooper and Tom Hodge “Remnants (Satirist Remix)”

Or see Cobby’s earlier video for the duo:

Max Cooper / Tom Hodge – Fragments of Self from Nick Cobby on Vimeo.

My music video for Max Cooper's new track, in collaboration with pianist Tom Hodge.

Download at: smarturl.it/FragmentedOne

Words by Max Cooper:

This track and video are about emergence from the combination of polar opposites. Fragments of self from very different places, but part of the same whole. Combining classical and computational elements is something I've been experimenting with for some years, but this attempt to combine the extreme opposites of each was spurred on by some chance DJing experiments, a fortuitous collaboration opportunity, and the amazing work of my friends Olafur Arnalds and Vaetxh (Rob Clouth). I found that I could mix the most beautiful and delicate piano solo of Olafur, with the most hyper-edited and jarring glitch of Vaetxh, and that the result actually worked, well, for me anyway, even if half the people in the club stood confused about how to dance. So when the opportunity arose to work with the pianist and composer Tom Hodge, I wanted to try and create this form of merger of extremes for a release, rather than it being confined to my DJ toolbox (also on the classical meets glitch history from a slightly different angle, check out "Rossz Csillag Alatt Született" from Venetian Snares 2005!). After some discussion of ideas and approach with Tom, he sat and played and made some recordings for me, which I then chopped and build chords and structure around, sent them back to him to play over the top of again, and then back to me to edit and glitch the playing along with the nasty noises. My detailing process was that of finding some interesting sound sources (binaural recordings, drum hit samples, clangs and slams etc) and using some Max for live randomisation chains to generate lots of partially random complexity which I could then edit as audio before repeating the process with additional layers, eventually bringing the recorded piano audio in to the editing too. At completion of the audio I was really happy to find out that Nick Cobby, one of my favourite video artists and long standing collaborator, was available and interested in working on the visual side of the project. He took the combination of seemingly incompatible opposites, and applied it visually with his beautiful generative forms, smooth and organic for the melodic sections, and jagged and abrasive for the percussive sections – big thanks to Nick for his amazing work as always! So, that's probably enough ranting about this track from me, aside from why it is like it is, I hope it's something that you can enjoy irrespective of the conceptual faff.

Video: Nick Cobby
nickcobby.com

Audio: Max Cooper & Tom Hodge
maxcooper.net
tomhodge.com

Solo, Max also has his own audiovisual show:

Max Cooper presents EMERGENCE – trailer video from Max Cooper on Vimeo.

Hello, my new live show is called Emergence, and it's an audio-visual story of how everything comes from simple natural processes, one built upon the other.

The first shows are as follows, with tickets links shown below:

"One of the most striking live experiences out there" – Mixmag

"The most beautiful and stunning display of talent and technology we've ever hosted" – Decibel Festival

14 Feb – Akvarium, Budapest
Thu 5 Mar – Oval Space, London *
Fri 6 Mar – Um:Laut, Berlin
Sat 14 Mar – MeetFactory, Prague
Fri 27 Mar – Paradiso Nord, Amsterdam **
Sat 28 Mar – Reflektor, Liege
Fri 24 Apr – Yoyo, Paris

* Special guest Tom Hodge
** Special guest The Slow Revolt

Tickets: www.bit.ly/MaxCooperEMERGENCE

Trailer: https://vimeo.com/117997705
Interview: https://vimeo.com/117997705
How Emergence works: https://vimeo.com/124936375

I worked with lots of different video artists and musicians, plus two mathematicians, putting together content to tell the story I wanted, and a performance system that allows me to control both the music and the visuals simultaneously live. It's been a challenging project, but a lot of fun, and hopefully is something interesting.

There is a lot of background information and structure to the show and it's chapters, but I also wanted it to be enjoyable without the analysis too, on a purely visual and musical level, as I think it's important for people to take what they want from it, rather than the experience being too prescriptive.

The story starts from fundamentals like the structure of numbers (the distribution of the primes) and (hyper)dimensionality, before going into the big bang, universe formation, stars, falling into a black hole, the earth, early life forms, cellular forms and intracellular chaos, plant growth/photosynthesis, and eventually the arrival of humans, the birth of awareness, the capitalist machine, the digital self and post digital age – all as my own interpretation of each topic of course, it's not a lecture, but the messages are there if you want to delve beyond the surface of each section.

I chose this idea because it tied to some of my old video content and work, and also provided me with a huge range of visual ideas to explore and to continue to develop for the show. Because I have live control over the visuals and music, no two shows will be the same, with different narrative content as well as different music and live editing of both the music and visuals each time.

As well as telling the story through each separate chapter, I put a lot of effort into designing synced audio and visual effects that allow me to deconstruct any scene and piece of music into underlying form. So rich scenes get broken down further and further into ever more simple building blocks, and built back up again, as a link to the idea of form underlying reality, and simple natural laws yielding the complex world we live in.

I'm excited to be doing a special version of Emergence with my collaborator and the composer/pianist Tom Hodge for the Berlin show, and to have The Slow Revolt supporting in Amsterdam.

Big thanks to Sam Mardon for filming at BEAF and putting together this video, and Cameron and Matt for filming the premiere at Decibel Festival.

And hopefully see you at one of the shows soon!

Thanks for letting us aboard your ship onto this sea and escape from reality – we always need it now and then.

The post Sail a Sea of Sound, in Beautiful World of Max Cooper and Tom Hodge appeared first on Create Digital Music.


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Replika Sound releases Dark Piano Composer Edition for Kontakt 5

Monday, July 6th, 2015

Replika Sound has announced the launch of RSSD01 Dark Piano Composer Edition for Kontakt 5, which consists of 3155 samples in 9 instruments including 356 textural loops. This 5.5 GB cinematic [Read More]
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Mold Sound with Tingle, a Music Controller That Looks Like Pin Art

Friday, July 3rd, 2015

Click here to view the embedded video.

It looks like Pin Art or Pinscreens – those moldable frames full of pins popularized in the 80s. But the result is something that lets you dig your hands into sound and musical structures in new ways. It looks expressive and, let’s be honest, really fun.

(For the research minded, there’s also a NIME report below.)

From the edge of the Netherlands’ slick design scene, industrial designer and music technologist Arvid Jense joins CDM for a series of interviews with Eindhoven Music Startups. Here’s his encounter with Nupky.

Eindhoven Music Startups: Nupky

Rhys Duindam is a graduated Industrial Designer from TU/e. Through Nupky, he is creating a tangible music controller which aims to bring back a the acoustic touch and feel to digital music creation. Inspired by a pinscreen, the Tingle will let you mold sounds with your hands or anything else. A release date is not yet available.

How did you come to make your product?

If you look at most digital music gear it uses sliders, knob and buttons to control sound. These were basically the only available interface elements at the time synthesizers were developed. But because of this, we have lost most of the acoustic qualities of music instruments. Digital instruments have their own strengths, but the acoustic experience of a piano or guitar is priceless. With Tingle I am trying to recapture that acoustic experience in electronic instruments.

Most of the product I developed myself, but how I got there was through the help of my coach Hans Leeuw. He pointed me towards the right sources and pushed me to continue Tingle rather than moving on to a new project. For this I am grateful.

Tingle consists of:

  • pressure sensitive pins (which are spring loaded so that they push back on your fingers)
  • an accelerometer (to detect things like shakes and thereby create whammy bar-like effects)
  • and vibration motors (so you feel what’s happening with the sound, a bit like the vibrations in the body of an acoustic guitar against your own body).

What I want is for a Tinglist to have a specific role in a band. For example; the soundscape player of the band. This would be lost if I would make Tingle an all-in-one device. So I am orchestrating specific software synthesizers to be made, which the Tingle then controls. We might add MIDI control later as a secondary function, once all the control subtlety has been brought in.

Tingle

It can certainly be interesting to combine all components of music under one controller, like DJ’s have it, but then that would be the specific characteristic of that controller. But if a player wants to be in control of a specific role in the song composition (like a guitarist would), you’re going to feel very limited. Personally I think that more digital instruments should find their specific sound/play character.

A good example is Ableton Push. It might initially look like it is just a grid of buttons, but it is very well thought out. There is a specific character with which it integrates with the software, so that music production finally feels like you are playing a musical instrument again, and not controlling variables. I think this is a huge step into the right direction.

What are your future plans?

There is no fixed deadline to the release Tingle, but we hope to make the five looks-like feels-like prototypes with a synthesizer within a month. These will be fully functional and will be given to a number of musicians to see what can still be improved before Tingle goes into production. Hopefully before the end of the year I can sell the first units. But things always take more time than you would expect, so who knows it might be next summer.

I want to sell Tingle for about €400. It should be a lot cheaper than specialty controllers like the Haaken Continuum, and more in the price range of a multi-effects pedal, because I want everybody to be able to use it. But first I have some hurdles to conquer before that is possible. The biggest issue right now is that each Tingle needs 512 pins. For 5000 tingles, that would mean we have to make over 2.5 million pins, put springs on each pin and insert them into Tingles. It takes a lot manual labor to do this.

In the meantime, we are looking at different mappings of the grid to sound; be it zoned or more blob/molding-like. We hope to be able to switch from a sound-building mode to a sound-playing mode. In build mode, you’ll be able to mold the synthesis parameter with your hands, and following this you can play your sounds in play mode. So if you want to switch to a solo sound, you just have to remember the shape to play it.

Mark IJzerman is one of the sound designers working with me on Tingle. He made the very first soundscape for Tingle, which at that time was a plugin for Ableton in which you had a grid that was coupled to a musical scale. This meant that wherever you pushed, you got a bunch of complementary notes and that always sounded good. This was important as a demo because we wanted to show that everyone could make great sounds with Tingle.

Mark is now working with Andreas Lo-A-Njoe, our sound programmer, to transform everything you do with Tingle into directly logical sounds. So that you feel like you are getting the sounds you intended; such as subtle sounds when you use the tips of your fingers or bombastic sounds when you push your full hand into it with force. This very likely would mean that we will step away from the grid mechanic, as it is too static for such a dynamic interface as Tingle.

Diemo Swarz, researcher / developer at IRCAM, modified CataRT for Tingle. CataRT is a software he wrote which splits a sample into many grains, and then places similar grains next to each other in a 2D grid (much like the pins are oriented on Tingle). So when you press somewhere in Tingle, you will get a group of sounds which all sound similar. For example, a sample of fire crackling will make it feel like you can really play and control fire. Super cool stuff.

Click here to view the embedded video.

The creative team Ethno Tekh, from Melbourne, is also writing something for Tingle using their own granular synthesizer – Grain Plane. With this it will feel like you are playing moving echo’s. Really great stuff.

But this is only in music. Since Tingle is a sensor, it is a tool. It can be used for anything that takes queues from a computer. I know I will be working on some VJing applications in the near future.

Why are you doing this?

It might sound silly, but one of my main motivators was seeing that a lot of [industrial design] student projects just stay as ideas. A lot of people have had super awesome concepts, which just died. So I felt like we needed role-models who succeed in bringing their projects to market. And I must admit, by doing it I understand why it doesn’t happen more often; it’s just really difficult.

It’s difficult because what I’m doing is what they call a boot-strapped startup, which basically means you’ve got no money at all. You have to manage everything yourself. I’ve invested more than €18.000 into Tingle up until now, which is paid for by teaching, making videos and doing other jobs on the side. The only things I pay for are food and rent. And everything else goes into my company.

9

Next to this, my vision is about helping people with their self-esteem through playful and magical interactions. I used to be very introverted and nerdy. I was bullied and had terrible self-esteem. Over the years I got past this, but when I look back, I think, why did I live like this? Most people suffer from self-esteem, and this holds them back. So many people with great talent, who underestimated themselves, never fulfill their potential. Design is just my medium, through which I hope to show people that they are better than they know.  I like to quote Edmund Burke: “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”

What do you think design thinking brings to electronic instruments?

When I look at the electrical engineers, I really feel like I’m not smart enough. Engineers are really smart people. But my focus is on the beauty of interaction, on the ways people use things. Engineers have a talent with programming and building the most fantastic and crazy technological things, but quite often these things miss the human aspect. Some even embrace non-humanness. For instance I recently saw an instrument which had a body frame with connected gloves, arms, head, going all around the body. Which is cool! But most people in the world are not looking forward to putting on a robot suit to play music. Engineers often work from what is possible, “yes this is possible and this and that”, while a designer will say “Why this? And why that?”.  I guess that is the difference.

But I think a lot of designers can be a bit arrogant, thinking our way is the Holy Grail to save the world. Bullshit. It’s through partnerships of different people that you get truly awesome things. Put aside the ego. Technical people make crazy innovations, we designers bring the human aspects to technology and business people ensure that those things succeed in the real world.

Tingle (1)

How do you deal with investors?

I wanted to start with a Kickstarter, but I didn’t feel confident that I could get enough people interested in a short time.  It’s not like people stumble upon your Kickstarter and spontaneously decide to invest. It’s only when two thirds of your project is funded that it gets traction. And at the time I tought, I’m no salesman. I’m a designer and an inventor.

So to ensure the project arrives on the market, I’m now working with Ad van Berlo and Joost van Dijk to fine-tune the product and business. Joost will help with the business plan and negotiations, Ad will get Tingle manufacture ready, and I will take care of the experience, service and vision.

To prepare for this, we teamed up with two young entrepreneurs (FRANS prototyping) to developed a new sensor for Tingle; and these guys are wunderkinds. They’ve transformed the old sensor I’ve developed into something six times faster, making it zero latency, having a 100% improvement in signal-noise reduction, and removing a lot of the earlier bugs. Also our two sound designers Mark IJzerman and Andreas Lo-A-Njoe are hard at work!

7

Is your product Open-Source?

I’ve gotten a patent on the technology of the Tingle; which takes a lot time & money and I don’t really agree with the principle, but I need it as a negotiation tool. I would like to let my patent be open to use for experimentation and the furtherment of knowledge, but malicious companies who just want to copycat my product also need to be considered.

All in all I’m a big supporter of open-source technology. All software will be published as open max/msp or puredate objects, so users can make their own patches with it. The danger however when making open-source products is that I won’t get a return on my investment, so I won’t be able to continue making more products like this. I’m still figuring out how to do this correctly. I might need to find a job on the side. I always choose for my vision over money, but at some point money will become an issue towards that vision.

Together with Diemo Schwarz  and Hans Leeuw, I’m writing a paper for NIME. In the article I explain all the design and technical aspects of Tingle; how it works and how you can build it yourself. All theories of giving electronic instruments more acoustic properties are also discussed. Basically a summary of the one and a half years of knowledge I’ve gained on this project so other people can also make use of it.

I publish it because I want to see the things made by the crazy genius of technology savvy people who can take my ideas to a level which I can’t reach. I believe in the power of many, and the more people who have access to a technology, the more interesting the results will be. To keep this alive I will be making a website on which you can share the creations you make with the Tingle, whether it is a soundscape or a VJ controller. Should be great!

How is Eindhoven for you?

I’ve often considered other places. In fact, just after graduating I wanted to go to San Francisco, just for skateboarding and the sun. The Dutch weather doesn’t really match with my sports passion. I stayed because I have a great network in Eindhoven. The Dutch government supports young companies decently and Eindhoven is quite often seen as a next technological world center. We’ve got all creative and skilled people around us.  I’ve joined the Designers collective DOK.PUNT and I could 100% recommend joining a collective like this if you are an independent designer. Because this way you will always have people around you to discuss ideas with, or find out things if you don’t know the answer, and this actually happens constantly.

Eindhoven is also crazy full of starting companies; you can feel the energy in the air like electricity. There is a bubble of creative energy here which will explode at some day. OWOW and LunchBox synths are some of the other people making instruments here in Eindhoven. So there is always someone to spar with.

shop1web

What is the future of music?

We can break our need for traditional instruments now, because we as generation Y have grown up with technology. We fight for our individuality, and we are constantly looking to the future. There are a lot of artists also looking for new ways to make their style unique. So I don’t think it’ll be a problem for new instruments to be accepted. But we do have to take care that it won’t become a gadget economy. A box with sixteen knobs and samples won’t be enough anymore. The objects will have to become real musical instruments, which allow you to use a range of skills to make music.

Tingle has the advantage in this because it a ‘wanna-have’ object; you just want to touch it. Some children at a demo recently were playing with Tingle for at least half an hour whilst telling their parents that they would rather have a Tingle than an iPad for Christmas. A pretty good indication I would say that they liked it.

Tingle at NIME

Tingle was a featured presentation at this year’s international New Instruments for Musical Expression (NIME) conference, held a few weeks ago at Louisiana State University in the USA. The project is available as part of the NIME proceedings (with a free PDF) if you care to learn more:

Tingle: A Digital Music Controller Re-Capturing the Acoustic Instrument Experience

Rhys Duindam, Nupky, Eindhoven University of Technology,
Diemo Schwarz, ISMM team, Ircam–CNRS–UPMC
Hans Leeuw, Electrumpet, University of the Arts Utrecht, University of Huddersfield

The post Mold Sound with Tingle, a Music Controller That Looks Like Pin Art appeared first on Create Digital Music.


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Ample Sound updates Ample Guitar and Ample Bass to v2.1.0 with MIDI Guitar Support

Wednesday, June 24th, 2015

Ample Sound has updated Ample Guitar (AGG, AGF, AGP, AGL, AGM, AGT and AGML) and Ample Bass (ABP, ABJ) to version 2.1.0. Changes: Added MIDI guitar support. Users can record complete fingering [Read More]
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Wide Blue Sound updates ‘ORBIT’ Kontakt Instrument

Tuesday, June 16th, 2015

Wide Blue Sound has unveiled ORBIT v1.1, an update to the company’s Orbital Synthesizer for Kontakt. In this release, ORBIT becomes a Kontakt Player library, gains compatibility with external [Read More]
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Sound Dust releases “Cloud Cello” for Kontakt with 20% off intro offer

Friday, June 12th, 2015

Sound Dust has released Cloud Cello for Kontakt with a 20% off intro offer until 26th June, 2015. Cloud Cello is a new take on an old instrument using unlikely bowing materials and techniques [Read More]
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Line 6 unveils Helix – Guitar processor designed to redefine the sound and feel of modeling

Friday, June 12th, 2015

Line 6 has unveiled Helix, their new flagship tour-ready guitar processor. Helix represents a giant leap forward in guitar processing, as well as a new way of thinking about guitarists and [Read More]
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Line 6 unveils Helix – Guitar processor designed to redefines the sound and feel of modeling

Thursday, June 11th, 2015

Line 6 has unveiled Helix, their new flagship tour-ready guitar processor. Helix represents a giant leap forward in guitar processing, as well as a new way of thinking about guitarists and [Read More]
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Orange Free Sounds releases Free “Farm Animal Sounds” Sound Pack

Thursday, June 11th, 2015

Orange Free Sounds has released Farm Animal Sounds, free Sound Pack in WAV format. The content was originally recorded for this Sound Pack and all sounds are real – There are no imitated animal [Read More]
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